41
Oct 19

musicwevsite:

Orange Juice, “Blue Boy” from Blue Boy b/w Love Sick (Postcard, 1980)

188 plays

9
Oct 18

alexanderpost:

casuals playlist

24 plays

4
Oct 18
Dog.

Dog.


3
Oct 17

I really liked the way those films in the late nineties that were coloured like they were made with green-blue fluorescent lights looked. I don’t know if that’s was always intended or just the result of low budgets, which half of those movies seemed to be. That colour spectrum always seems less intimate and more sterile, and far less nostalgic in a way that warm toned film usually seems more old fashioned, but the cool tones have their own era and that was like twenty years ago too. The trick is probably to make it on actual film and then use the cool lighting, otherwise it’ll probably look absolutely like shite video.


The Charade “140 bpm Misery Love Song”

The Charade are basically a Swedish indiepop super group.


51
Oct 16

leoniescabinet:

Today’s track is self-explanatory

Blueboy - The Joy of Living

(thanks for this Max)

499 plays

32
Oct 16
To the aesthetic eye, which sides with the useless against utility, the aesthetic, when severed violently from purpose, becomes anti-aesthetic, because it expresses violence: luxury becomes brutality. Finally it is swallowed up in drudgery or conserved in caricature.
Adorno, Minima Moralia II.77. “Auction.” Translated by E.F.N. Jephcott. (via getradified)

(Source: adornography)


17
Oct 16
hyperallergic:

(via Japanese-Paraguayan Photographer Searches for a Homeland)
Leaving one’s country to make a new life in another can be an isolating experience, but growing up as the child or grandchild of an immigrant can also be lonely in its own way. Photographer Ricardo Nagaoka knows this firsthand. His grandparents were part of a diaspora that fled World War II-era Japan for South American soil. Having spent the first 12 years of his life in Paraguay, he is a sansei — a Japanese word used to distinguish children of parents born in a different country.
READ MORE

hyperallergic:

(via Japanese-Paraguayan Photographer Searches for a Homeland)

Leaving one’s country to make a new life in another can be an isolating experience, but growing up as the child or grandchild of an immigrant can also be lonely in its own way. Photographer Ricardo Nagaoka knows this firsthand. His grandparents were part of a diaspora that fled World War II-era Japan for South American soil. Having spent the first 12 years of his life in Paraguay, he is a sansei — a Japanese word used to distinguish children of parents born in a different country.

READ MORE


1537
Oct 16

I had no one to help me, but then T. S. Eliot helped me.

So when people say that poetry is a luxury, or an option, or for the educated middle classes, or that it shouldn’t be read at school because it is irrelevant, or any of the strange stupid things that are said about poetry and its place in our lives, I suspect that the people doing the saying have had things pretty easy. A tough life needs a tough language – and that is what poetry is. That is what literature offers – a language powerful enough to say how it is.

It isn’t a hiding place. It is a finding place.

Jeanette Winterson, Why Be Happy When You Could Be Normal?  (via ablogwithaview)

(Source: afewofmyfavourites)


Baffin Island “You Make Two Weeks Two Days”

Lovers of Camera Obscura, listen.

Free here: http://www.eardrumspop.com/2010/11/20/epop009-baffin-island/